Saturday, December 09, 2017

Simplicity of Watercolours

A couple of weeks ago a attended a Golden product demo. Most of the two hours were spent on acrylics and other products.

As a watercolourist, there are very few products to learn about. We have our paint, water, masking fluid and a few mediums rarely used.

For acrylic painters there are different types of paint, some are thin (high flow) while others are very thick (heavy body) and then there are those in the middle (fluid). There are also a number of different gels, mediums, pastes or additives depending on which thickness of paint you use.  My head was spinning hearing about more than 20 different products.

I have no intention of picking up acrylics, but it appears that anybody wanting to learn on their own would have to do a lot more research than is required for watercolours.

After the demo, I was extremely grateful for the simplicity of watercolour products.

The person giving the demo, spoke to us about the modern and old colours and some of their properties.  The following link might be of use if you'd like to learn more about this topic: https://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/waterfs.html

Today's artist find is
Rukiye Garip
Rukiye Garip watercolour
Have a great holiday,
Danielle

Saturday, November 04, 2017

Tips for Creating Intense Colors and Strong Values

I have been busier than normal lately with a number of exhibits and a longer term project that I'm working on. Hence, I'm reducing the frequency of this blog.

Watercolours have a reputation for being light and sometimes dull. What can one do to create more vibrant watercolours? It may considered a challenge with watercolours to create more intense colors and a full range of values, but it shouldn't be. Here are a few tips:

1. Adoption of artist-grade watercolours.

Use artist grade watercolours because they have more pigment which means more concentrated colour on the paper, hence more intensity.

2. Use less water in washes

Since watercolour has a unique problem of drying between 50% - 70% lighter than it looks when it’s wet, it’s important not to start off with too much of a watery wash. So it may help to simply mix a wash that’s twice as dark as you want, then test it on a scrap of watercolor paper first.

3. Application of glazes

Sometimes you may be cautious with your washes. When the paint is dry and looks too light and you want more intensity, add additional glazes to the dry surface. Repeat until you get the intensity that you want to have.  This also helps in maintaining light.

4. Application of grisaille


Today's artist find is Catherine Rey
Catherine Rey watercolours
Happy painting
Danielle

Saturday, October 07, 2017

Art in Tuscany

I'm just finishing a vacation in Tuscany and was impressed how pervasive art is. Tuscan art and culture are inseparable and is a model for many countries for years to come and for this area of Italy.

Art is preserved in historical artifacts and buildings from the etruscan, roman, medieval, renaissance times. Art is part of what attracts visitors, from around the world, year-round to this area. Paintings and sculptures by Michelangelo, one of the greatest Tuscan famous artists are found in key areas.

Obviously art is found in some of the greatest museums such as the Uffizi in Florence, however it is also found in the buildings’ architecture and sculptures. Art is intertwined with the beautification of buildings, public areas and homes. In addition there are numerous public art displays and art galleries.

You don’t need to visit large cities to see some great art. Frescos are painted into the plasterwork of the numerous churches, palaces, chapels and cathedrals in every town and there are many wonderful works carved in stone.

Although there is much historical art in Tuscany, the medieval villages and rolling hills of Tuscany will continue to inspire artists for years to come. I appreciated seeing and meeting a high number of Tuscan watercolorists during this vacation.

Today's artist find is Elizabeth Cochrane
Have a great week
Danielle

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Too much of a good thing

There are a number of different ways to create technique in watercolour, Here are just a few:
  • plastic wrap
  • dry brushing
  • splatter
  • sprinkling salt
  • alcohol or water drops
  • sponge
  • etc.
Like many things in life, just because you can doesn't mean that you should. Although these techniques are fun to learn and use to create various textures, it's easy to overuse them.  When you overdo any of these techniques, you are detracting from the painting.

It's important to know when to use sparingly for impact and not overpower the painting.

This applies to many other things in life. you've probably seen overuse animated objects of effects in Powerpoint slides.

Today's artist find is Sue Dickinson
Sue Dickinson watercolour
Have a great week,
Danielle